Bread head sculptures

Bread head sculptures – András Böröcz
2003 – New York

One of András Böröcz and his wife Robbin Ami Silverberg’s actions was carried out at the Popieluszko Square next to their apartment, the purpose of which was to have the pigeons floating in the square devouring or at least breaking down the sculptures made of bread. The pigeons walked around the bread heads, but did not harm them, paying tribute to Böröcz’s art. The square was named after a Polish priest murdered in 1987. Later the Polish community in Brooklyn erected a statue for his memory. The head of the statue was broken on the day before the initiation. Böröcz reacted with the Breadhead statue in action, documented by Robbin Ami Silverberg and become the Bread Head Story.

8 pieces of bread head sculptures
photo: Hübner Teodóra

For Freedoms

“Since the end of our inaugural #50StateInitiative, we have been reflecting on the multitude of experiences we all shared over the past few months. For us, the most important victory was all that we were able to do it together. It is in this spirit of collective action that we invite you to reflect with us on the Thanksgiving holiday”

Thanksgiving dinner 1
Thanksgiving dinner 2

For Freedoms is a collective of artists, institutions & organizations across the US activating innovative pathways to civic participation.

Count the dough

“Although it’s impossible to trace the exact date of the first slang usage of “dough” as a term for money, it seems to have originated in the 19th century. Since bread was the traditional everyday necessity of life, to earn one’s living was to earn one’s bread, therefore bread became synonymous with money. On some unknown day, an individual whose identity is lost to historians simply substituted the word dough, and a new slang term came into use. “

source

Good Enough to Eat

Margaret Harrison – Good Enough to Eat
1971 – Lithograph on paper

sexy women in a burger
Good Enough to Eat 1971 Margaret Harrison born 1940 Presented by Curwen Studio through the Institute of Contemporary Prints 1975 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/P06246